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The erosion of our military, and thus, our national defense.  Who’s responsible???   Flower power children of the Sixties and their communist counterparts.

MILGAYS IN CHINA
Written by Dr. Jack Wheeler
Tuesday, 21 December 2010

There’s no use bemoaning DADT Repeal by 65 anti-military Senators.  It’s done.  Openly homosexual men and women can no longer be rejected for service in the US military on that basis.  Let’s call them “milgays” for short.

While Hate America Democrats and the enemedia are celebrating, those who wish to prevent the homosexualization of the US military need to be thinking of how to have milgays be in China.

Metaphorically in China, that is – as in applying to them the famous Chinese admonition, Be careful what you wish for because you just might get it.

To begin with, there may be a real silver lining to the whole DADT dodge being in the dumpster.  Under DADT, milgays could serve, but everyone was supposed to pretend to be blind and then wink with the blind eye.  No more pretending, no more hypocrisy.  Milgays are out of the DADT Closet.  Now let’s see if they like being in the sunshine.

The victimology game they intend to play is obvious:  claim harassment and bigotry at every whisper of a hint of criticism or any time they don’t get their way.

This game provides an opportunity in a post-DADT military for a Zero Tolerance policy regarding false and malicious accusations by milgays of alleged harassment and bigotry.  If the accusing milgay has solid evidence, fine.  But if he (or she) doesn’t, then it’s an automatic Dishonorable Discharge.

The real actual problem of milgays will be, of course, their sexually harassing straight colleagues.  Another opportunity for a Zero Tolerance policy.  If a male soldier sexually harasses a female soldier and she kicks him the groin, no problem, good for her.  The same exact policy should apply to a guy harassed by a milgay.

Anyone who expects a flood of sexual harassment suits by milgays as plaintiffs should expect a similar flood of suits with them as defendants.

And just as there has been a long standing military policy disallowing any overt expression of male-female fraternization, that same policy will now be applied – strictly, zero tolerance – to milgays fraternizing with each other.

Another silver lining to DADT Repeal is that there is now a long lag time in implementing it.  This is why Bobby Gates and some of the Pentagon Brass nodded their approval to Congress.  What really scares them is pro-homosexual federal judges declaring DADT to be “unconstitutional,” and ordering an immediate lifting of the ban.

This is exactly what pro-homosexual U. S. District Court Judge Virginia Phillips did last September.  Enormous pressure by the Pentagon got the Justice Dept. to appeal the order to the U.S. Court of Appeals, which granted a stay of Phillips’ order.  In exchange, Gates promised he would support the repeal in Congress.

Thus the Pentagon, rather than being thrown into chaos by liberal judges, now has up to a year or more to put into place its Support Plan for Implementation regarding milgays.

In other words, what Congress just voted into law was not an immediate repeal of DADT – that’s what the lib-judge tried to do.  It voted for a process of implementing DADT repeal over time.

Note that the day after Judge Phillips’ ruling, would-be milgays lined up at military recruitment centers – but they won’t tomorrow (12/22) when Zero signs the law, because DADT remains the law and is not actually repealed until the repeal process is fully implemented.

Take a look at the Pentagon plan linked above – it’s complicated, complex, and time-consuming.  It will take, according to Gates, at least a year.  Then, after the plan is all ready, the President, The SecDef, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs must all certify that DADT Repeal Implementation will not affect combat readiness.

And then, according to the DADT Repeal law just passed by Congress, there must follow a 60-day waiting period before formal certification of repeal.  It is only after all of this – which takes us into the Spring of 2012 – that milgays can serve openly.

This is certainly enough time to include in the implementation plan the zero tolerance policies outlined above.  And close enough to November 2012, when we can get a pro-American, pro-military President elected who will see these policies take real effect.

One effect you can count on is that most milgays will end up REMFs (ask a vet what that means).  Or to use another term, they’ll be FOBBITs – and that can be explained in polite company.

As a Hobbit in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings never leaves the safety of the Shire, a FOBBIT is a non-combat weenie who never leaves his Forward Operating Base or FOB.

Homosexuals may be initially attracted to the military like a magnet – but magnetic force can repel as well as attract.  It may turn out that DADT Repeal will result in a military more repellent than attractive to milgays than before.

DADT Repeal means the end of pretend.  They want to be in the open?  Maybe not if there is Zero Tolerance for milgay victimization, intimidation, and fraternization.  Maybe not if they end up not in a homosexual fantasyland but in China instead, a place where Chinese admonitions come true.

*** MISSION READINESS??? ***

Mission: Readiness is the nonprofit, bi-partisan organization led by senior retired military leaders ensuring continued American security and prosperity into the 21st century by calling for smart investments in the upcoming generation of American children.

As senior military leaders, we have spent our lives in service to our country. We understand the challenges we face at home and abroad. We are proud that America has the most highly-skilled, best-equipped, and most professional military in history.

Competent, educated, and healthy young people are the future patriots tasked with defending America’s national security and prosperity.

Today, 75 percent of 17 to 24-year-olds do not meet the basic minimum standards required for military service.

A limited recruitment pool will hold back our military readiness and erode our national security in the long run. What can we do now to ensure that this trend is not the wave of the future?

Very Respectfully,
Executive Advisory Council
General John M. Shalikashvili, US Army (Ret.) General Henry “Hugh” Shelton, US Army (Ret.) General Walter E. Boomer, US Marine Corps (Ret.) General Wesley Clark, US Army (Ret.), General Richard E. Hawley, US Air Force (Ret.) General Lester L. Lyles, US Air Force (Ret.) General Gregory S. “Speedy” Martin, US Air Force (Ret.) General Wallace H. Nutting, US Army (Ret.) General Johnnie E. Wilson, US Army (Ret.) Admiral Leon A. “Bud” Edney, US Navy (Ret.) Admiral Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr., US Navy (Ret.) Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, US Navy (Ret.) Lieutenant General Joe N. Ballard, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Julius W. Becton, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Dennis L. Benchoff, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General John B. Blount, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General William J. Bolt, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Robert G. Gard, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Arthur J. Gregg, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Jerome B. Hilmes, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Donald L. Kerrick, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Carol A. Mutter, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Lieutenant General David H. Ohle, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General John P. Otjen, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Garry L. Parks, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Lieutenant General Ricardo S. Sanchez, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Norman R. Seip, US Air Force (Ret.)

Lieutenant General William P. Tangney, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Claudius E. “Bud” Watts, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Lieutenant General Ronald L. Watts, US Army (Ret.) Lieutenant General Joseph H. Wehrle, US Air Force (Ret.) Lieutenant General Robert J. Winglass, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Vice Admiral Donald Arthur, US Navy (Ret.) Vice Admiral Edward H. Martin, US Navy (Ret.) Vice Admiral James A. Zimble, US Navy (Ret.) Major General Earl L. Adams, US Army (Ret.) Major General James B. Allen, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Major General Keith D. Bjerke, US Air Force (Ret.) Major General Buford “Buff” Blount, US Army (Ret.) Major General Roger R. Blunt, US Army (Ret.) Major General William F. Burns, US Army (Ret.) Major General George A. Buskirk, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Major General Jack J. Catton, Jr., US Air Force (Ret.) Major General Carroll D. Childers, US Army (Ret.) Major General George F. Close, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Major General James W. Comstock, US Army (Ret.) Major General Wesley E. Craig, US Army (Ret.) Major General John T. Crowe, US Army (Ret.) Major General Nelson E. Durgin, US Air Force (Ret.) Major General Paul D. Eaton, US Army (Ret.) Major General Frank R. Faykes, US Air Force (Ret.) Major General John T. Furlow, US Army (Ret.) Major General James H. Garner, US Army (Ret.) Major General Peter J. Gravett, US Army (Ret.) Major General George H. Harmeyer, US Army (Ret.) Major General Ralph L. Haynes, US Army (Ret.)

Major General Donald R. Infante, US Army (Ret.) Major General Jerome Johnson, US Army (Ret.) Major General James A. Kelley, US Army (Ret.) Major General James R. Klugh, Sr., US Army (Ret.) Major General John W. Libby, US Army (Ret.) Major General James H. Lipscomb, US Army (Ret.) Major General William Joseph Lutz, US Air Force (Ret.) Major General Lester Martinez-Lopez, US Army (Ret.) Major General Paul E. Mock, US Army (Ret.) Major General Stephen E. Nichols, US Army (Ret.) Major General George W. “Nordie” Norwood, US Air Force (Ret.) Major General Daniel J. O’Neill, US Army (Ret.) Major General Joseph F. Perugino, US Army (Ret.) Major General Walter F. Pudlowski, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Major General James I. “Ike” Pylant, US Army (Ret.) Major General John A. Renner, US Army (Ret.) Major General Henry D. Robertson, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Major General H. Douglas Robertson, US Army (Ret.) Major General William H. Russ, US Army (Ret.) Major General Roger W. Sandler, US Army (Ret.) Major General George J. Smith, US Army (Ret.) Major General Carroll Thackston, US Army (Ret.) Major General Thomas J. Thorne, US Army (Ret.) Major General Paul E. Vallely, US Army (Ret.) Major General Jack C. Wheeler, US Army (Ret.) Major General Richard O. Wightman, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Rear Admiral James A. Barnett, US Navy (Ret.)

Rear Admiral Robert E. Besal, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral Walter H. Cantrell, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral James J. Carey, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral Roland G. Guibault, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral John F. Hekman, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral Edward K. Kristensen, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral James E. McPherson, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral Stuart F. Platt, US Navy (Ret.) Rear Admiral Joseph A. “Joe” Sestak, Jr., (Ret.) Rear Admiral Alan M. Steinman, US Coast Guard (Ret.) Rear Admiral Robert Sutton, US Navy (Ret.) Brigadier General Clara L. Adams-Ender, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Sherian G. Cadoria, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Robert G. Carmichael, Jr., US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Chalmers Carr, Jr., US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General George N. Clark, Jr., US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General Julia J. Cleckley, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Augustus L. Collins, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General James P. Combs, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Francis R. Dillon, US Air Force (Ret.), Brigadier General John W. Douglass, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General Michael A. Dunn, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Charles K. Ebner, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Evelyn “Pat” Foote, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Robert E. Gaylord, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Edward H. Gerhardt, US Army (Ret.)

Brigadier General Lawrence E. Gillespie, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Larry E. Gilman, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Larry W. Haltom, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General David Hicks, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Keith H. Kerr, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Phil Leventis, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General Donald H. Marden, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Roy Martin, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General David L. McGinnis, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Marvin E. Mitchiner, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Gary M. Profit, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Eugene “Gene” Richardson, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Velma L. “Von” Richardson, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General James H. Schwitters, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Roger L. Shields, US Army (Ret.), Brigadier General David A. Sprenkle, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General Preston Taylor, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General William T. Thielemann, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Richard W. Tuttle, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General Terry J. Tyler, US Army (Ret.), Brigadier General Ted Vander Els, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Augustine A. Verrengia, US Air Force (Ret.) Brigadier General John M. Watkins, US Army (Ret.) Brigadier General Jack Yeager, US Army (Ret.)

Enlisted Leadership
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Frederick J. Finch (Ret.) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy James L. Herdt (Ret.) Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps John L. Estrada (Ret.) Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Alford L. McMichael (Ret.) Sergeant Major of the Army Reserve Michele S. Jones (Ret.) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard Vincent Patton, III (Ret.) Sergeant Major of the Army Jack L. Tilley (Ret.)

Civilian Leadership
Former Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton, Former Under Secretary of the Army Joe R. Reeder

As of 5/27/2010

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